Pride

Hey, it is one of those deadly sins, right? In fact, a noted theologian says he can attribute just about every sin and shortcoming in our lives to pride. He is probably right when pride dominates and transcends and drives us. It leads to selfishness, to self-protection above all else, to stubborn independence that cares little about the needs of others, and so on.

So I feel a little awkward having to use the word pride to describe my emotions over the last few weeks.

But I guess, since I can take very little personal credit for anything I will mention, I hope I can avoid that nasty sinfulness associated with the word.

  1. I am proud of the students who participate in our music program at SPLS and the teachers who lead them. The recent Spring Concert was absolutely amazing on so many levels. But team spirit, leadership, and cooperation are words that I would add to the obvious ones of talent, preparation, confidence, and beauty. Great job, bands, handbells, chorus and all the soloists. Fantastic work Mrs. Lehmker, Mrs. Sherman and Music Director Mr. Bates.
  2. I am proud of our church for the truly thoughtful and moving series of worship services that marked Holy Week and the celebration of Christ’s resurrection. It is sad if you missed out on this time of reflection and then Easter joy.
  3. I am proud that through the leadership of Mrs. Debbie Pahl we have large numbers of students heading out on middle school class trips this week. These are super memorable experiences of learning and growth and adventure for our students.

And as a parallel note to this, I am proud of our nation and our state. All three trips will give students the opportunity to recognize the good done by our working together in a representative democracy where we share assets in order to provide shared benefits and to preserve individual freedoms.

  1. I am proud that individual students so often are able to respond to discipline situations with changes in attitudes and behavior. I want to attribute this to the work of God’s Spirit in their hearts and in the words and actions of teachers and staff working with them. While the track record is not perfect and flaws continue to crop up, I just know that students often respond to us having high expectations that they will be accountable for mistakes, learn from them, and move forward in God’s grace and love.

Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves,

Philippians 2:3

In His Children’s Service, Robert C. Boyd

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